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April is Alcohol Awareness Month 

Alcohol Awareness Month was created as an effort to reduce stigma and raise awareness about the prevention and treatment of alcohol abuse and addiction.

ALCOHOL ABUSE

Prevalance of Alcoholism in the U.S.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, an estimated 14.4 million Americans ages 18 and older had an alcohol use disorder (AUD) in 2018 according to NSDUH.

Across the nation, 26.45% individuals 18 and older reported that they engaged in binge drinking in the past month (typically 4 drinks for women and 5 drinks for men in about 2 hours) while 6.6% engaged in heavy alcohol use (binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past month) in the past month.

Each year, an estimated 88,000 people die from alcohol-related causes annually and in 2014 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities accounted for 31% of overall driving fatalities (9,967 deaths).

Unfortunately, these deaths could have been avoided, making alcohol the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States.

AWARENESS

Do You Know The Stages of Alcoholism?

STAGE 1

Early Addiction

During this stage, you’re just building up a tolerance to alcohol. You will notice that you need to drink larger quantities to get the same buzz, and you may find yourself drinking consistently. You may blame your drinking on stress or other problems. Others around you may being to notice that you’re changing or drinking more.

Stage 2

Middle Stage

During this stafe, you and others will start to see the noticeable physical and social effects of drinking. Many people experience blackouts from excessive drinking, and you will likely experiecne withdrawal symptoms when alcohol is unavailable. In addition, you may begin struggling with work, school, family and friends, responsibilities, and other people will likely recognize your problem with drinking.

Stage 2

Middle Stage

During this stafe, you and others will start to see the noticeable physical and social effects of drinking. Many people experience blackouts from excessive drinking, and you will likely experiecne withdrawal symptoms when alcohol is unavailable. In addition, you may begin struggling with work, school, family and friends, responsibilities, and other people will likely recognize your problem with drinking.

STAGE 3

Late Stage

During the late (also known as the end) stage of alcoholism, the disease infiltrates your physical, social, spiritual and mental health. By this point, you are likely having trouble sleeping, and you experience blackouts frequently. Alcoholism has taken a toll on your relationships, hobbies, and your career. At this stage, your body is suffering. You’re at a much higher risk of hepatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, recurring respiratory infections, pancreatitis and even heart failure.

Getting Help

If you feel you or a loved one are suffering from alcoholism, give us a call. We understand how overwhelming alcoholism can be, and we are here to help you with many treatment options.